Scroll down to learn more about the artist of this tree, Remelisa Cullitan, and the Pacific Islander culture! 

This tree is a masterpiece in progress. Perfection cannot be rushed! We will be posting updated photos as the tree comes closer to completion!

About the Artist

The artist representing the Pacific Islander culture this year is Remelisa Cullitan. When explaining how long they have been an artist, Remelisa says “Technically since I could hold a pen when I gifted my parents with a custom ballpoint pen wall mural when I was a toddler, however, professionally for five years. I have always been a creatively expressive child and that never left me in my adult years.” 


Two of Remelisa’s favorite pieces of work include a project by the name of Down There and a project by the name of Up or down. Down There was inspired by Japanese artist Megumi Igarashi. Remelisa’s work aims to destigmatize topics surrounding female genitalia. They made an armature to display a kimono and a pedestal to also display the woodblock which is at crotch level. 

Up or Down is a series of pant-hoses with hand-sewn hair extensions. Remelisa’s beginning idea was “What if body hair had the same treatment as the hair on our head and was treated more fashionable.” They wanted to show a potential future where body hair, especially on women’s bodies, was accepted and not shamed.

Some of Remelisa’s favorite pieces are showcased here! 

Remelisa has three public artworks in Spokane. A signal box on 10th Avenue and Perry Street, another signal box on Francis Avenue and Market Street, and they did the second letter “E” on the collaborative Black Lives Matter mural on Main Avenue near Browne Street!

You can find Remelisa’s work displayed on their website at www.Remelisa.com or you can follow them on Instagram at @remelisacullitan

Learn More About Remelisa Cullitan

About the Pacific Islander Culture

The Pacific Islands are represented in Northwest Winterfest this year by the Republic of Palau and Chuck! The organization has been in the Spokane area more than 12 years. Today there are more than 100 residents in the Inland Northwest that are a part of the Pacific Islander culture group!

The two most popular holidays celebrated by the Pacific Islander culture group are Christmas and New Years! Traditional dishes made around the winter holidays include fish rice spam, red potatoes, fish, and pig! Also during this time of year, it is considered tradition to wear grass skirts and hand-woven clothing!

The Republic of Palau and Chuck keeps the Pacific Islander culture alive by teaching their community about culture and tradition, because they are the smallest country in the world!

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